So what if a Brewers minor leaguer almost died and no one bothered to report it?

Earlier tonight, 20 year old Brewers minor league utility man Julio Mendez got hit in the heart by a pitch. The freaking heart.

The reporting on this so far has been scant. Maybe forgivable if the Brewers were playing on the east coast, as the Arizona game would have happened well after bedtime.

Maybe forgivable even if the Brewers were playing a home game.

The Brewers were playing the Dodgers tonight in Los Angeles.

Just southeast of there, a Brewers minor leaguer nearly died.

And so far the reporting on this has been… not robust.

I’d like to think that this is because of the time difference. But beat reporters were in the same time zone.

I’d like to think that if this had been Corey Ray or Tristen Lutz taking a fastball to the heart, something would have been said.

Yet here we are, and a nondescript Venezuelan named Julio Mendez got drilled by a pitch, nearly died, and has received no attention for it. JS Online? Nothing. Brewers.com? Nothing. MiLB.com? Something about Clayton Kershaw. Because he, Clayton Kershaw, is more important.

Julio Mendez is convalescing in a hospital room, but Clayton Kershaw.

Julio Mendez deserves more than that.

Top 200 MLB Draft Prospects for 2017 Still Available on Day 2

Here is the same list from yesterday, except that players taken yesterday have been eliminated. So here are the top 200 draft prospects still available as we open day 2 of the draft:

25. Blayne Enlow, HS, RHP
28. Nick Allen, HS, SS
39. Tanner Burns, HS, RHP
52. Brady McConnell, HS, SS
53. Garrett Mitchell, HS, OF
56. Jacob Heatherly, HS, LHP
58. Alex Scherff, HS, RHP
59. Luke Heimlich, 4Y, LHP
61. Blaine Knight, 4Y (So.), RHP
64. Matt Tabor, HS, RHP
68. James Marinan, HS, RHP
69. Jacob Pearson, HS, OF
73. Riley Adams, 4Y, C/OF
75. Bryce Bonnin, HS, RHP/SS
76. Kyle Hurt, HS, RHP
77. Daniel Cabrera, HS, OF
78. Luis Gonzalez, 4Y, OF/LHP
79. Mason House, HS, OF
80. Jake Eder, HS, LHP
81. Jake Thompson, 4Y, RHP
82. Kevin Smith, 4Y, SS
83. Evan Skoug, 4Y, C
84. Daniel Tillo, JC (So.), LHP
85. Shane Drohan, HS, LHP
86. Chris McMahon, HS, RHP
87. Michael Gigliotti, OF
88. Greg Jones, HS, SS
90. Seth Corry, HS, LHP
91. Jeremiah Estrada, HS, RHP
93. Connor Wong, 4Y, C/SS
95. KJ Harrison, 4Y, 1B/C
96. Matt Whatley, 4Y, C
97. Peter Solomon, 4Y, RHP
98. Tommy Mace, HS, RHP
100. Ernie Clement, 4Y, SS/OF
102. Tyler Johnson, 4Y, RHP
104. Garrett Cave, 4Y, RHP
105. Trevor Stephan, 4Y, RHP
107. Colton Hock, 4Y, RHP
108. Zach Rutherford, 4Y, SS
109. Taylor Walls, 4Y, SS
110. Cole Turney, HS, OF
112. Michael Baumann, 4Y, RHP
114. Asa Lacy, HS, LHP
115. Kyle Jacobsen, HS, OF
116. Adam Oviedo, HS, SS
117. Dalton Guthrie, 4Y, SS
118. Zach Pop, 4Y, RHP
120. Devin Hairston, 4Y, SS/2B
121. Tony Dibrell, 4Y, RHP
123. Joey Morgan, 4Y, C
124. Riley Mahan, 4Y, 2B/OF
125. Sam McMillan, HS, C
126. Will Gaddis, 4Y, RHP
127. Brendan Murphy, 4Y, LHP
129. Riley Ottesen, 4Y (So.), RHP
130. CJ Van Eyk, HS, RHP
131. Bryce Montes De Oca, 4Y, RHP
132. Jesse Berardi, 4Y, SS
133. Jake Mangum, 4Y (So.), OF
134. Quinn Brodey, 4Y, OF
135. Cade Cavalli, HS, RHP
136. Hunter Ruth, HS, RHP
137. Ricardo De La Torre, HS, SS
138. Sam Keating, HS, RHP
139. Andrew Bechtold, JC (So.), 3B
140. Jared Oliva, 4Y, OF
141. Jake Holmes, HS, SS
142. Donovan Casey, 4Y, OF
143. Noah Campbell, HS, SS
144. Gavin Williams, HS, RHP
145. Jack Leftwich, HS, RHP
146. Logan Allen, HS, LHP
147. Glenn Otto, 4Y, RHP
148. Charlie Barnes, 4Y, LHP
149. Lincoln Henzman, 4Y, RHP
150. Mike Rivera, 4Y, C
151. David Banuelos, 4Y, C
152. James Karinchak, 4Y, RHP
153. Seth Lonsway, HS, LHP
154. Zack Jackson, HS, C
155. Oliver Jaskie, 4Y, LHP
156. Jordan Anderson, HS, OF
157. Jackson Rutledge, HS, RHP
158. Nick Raquet, 4Y (So.), LHP
159. Tarik Skubal, 4Y, LHP
160. Caleb Sloan, HS, RHP
161. Steven Williams, HS, C
162. Daniel Ritcheson, HS, RHP
163. Chris Williams, 4Y, C
164. Keegan Thompson, 4Y, RHP
165. Brian Shaffer, 4Y, RHP
166. Austin Martin, HS, SS/2B
167. Seth Lonsway, HS, LHP
168. Griff McGarry, HS, RHP
169. Spencer Strider, HS, RHP
170. Jordan Spicer, JC (Fr.), RHP
171. Freddy Tarnok, HS, RHP
172. Mac Sceroler, 4Y, RHP
173. Carmen Mlodzinski, HS, RHP
174. Emerson Hancock, HS, RHP
175. Erich Uelmen, 4Y, RHP
176. Cordell Dunn, HS, C
178. Bryce Johnson, 4Y, OF
179. Ryley Widell, JC (So.), LHP
180. Jordan Fowler, HS, LHP
181. Philip Clarke, HS, C
182. Dylan Busby, 4Y, 3B/1B
183. Alex Toral, HS, 1B
184. Chad Spanberger, 4Y, 1B
185. Terry Fuller, HS, OF
186. Ricky Tyler Thomas, 4Y, LHP
187. Austin Wade, 4Y, OF
188. Joe Lancellotti, HS, RHP
189. Hugh Fisher, HS, LHP
190. Ryan Lillie, 4Y, RHP
191. Christian Sanatana, HS, RHP
192. Deon Stafford, 4Y, C
194. Kyle Johnston, 4Y, RHP
195. Cole Freeman, 4Y, 2B
196. Zach Haake, 4Y (So.), RHP
198. Colby Fitch, 4Y, C
199. Griffin Roberts, 4Y (So.), RHP
200. Logan Salow, 4Y (Sr.), LHP

Top 200 MLB Draft Prospects for 2017

These are the top 200 draft prospects, based on aggregate rankings of major scouting services:

1. Hunter Green, HS, RHP/SS
2. Kyle Wright, 4Y, RHP
3. Brendan McKay, 4Y, LHP/1B
4. MacKenzie Gore, HS, LHP
5. Royce Lewis, HS, SS/OF
6. JB Bukauskas, 4Y, RHP
7. Adam Haseley, 4Y, OF
8. Shane Baz, HS, RHP
9. Pavin Smith, 4Y, 1B
10. Austin Beck, HS, OF
11. Jeren Kendall, 4Y, OF
12. DL Hall, HS, LHP
13. Alex Faedo, 4Y, RHP
14. Nick Pratto, HS, 1B/LHP
15. Keston Hiura, 4Y, OF/2B
16. Sam Carlson, HS, RHP
17. David Peterson, 4Y, LHP
18. Jo Adell, HS, OF/RHP
19. Griffin Canning, 4Y, RHP
20. Jake Burger, 4Y, 3B/1B
21. Logan Warmoth, 4Y, SS/2B
22. Trevor Rogers, HS, LHP
23. Evan White, 4Y, 1B/OF
24. Bubba Thompson, HS, OF
25. Tanner Houck, 4Y, RHP
25. Blayne Enlow, HS, RHP
27. Nate Pearson, JC (So.), RHP
28. Nick Allen, HS, SS
29. Heliot Ramos, HS, OF
30. Brendon Little, JC (So.), LHP
31. Matt Sauer, HS, RHP
32. Alex Lange, 4Y, RHP
33. Drew Waters, HS, OF
34. Hans Crouse, HS, RHP
35. Seth Romero, 4Y, LHP
36. Mark Vientos, HS, SS/3B
37. Wil Crowe, 4Y, RHP
38. Clarke Schmidt, 4Y, RHP
39. Tanner Burns, HS, RHP
40. Tristan Beck, 4Y (So.), RHP
41. Tristen Lutz, HS, OF
42. Quentin Holmes, HS, OF
43. Corbin Martin, 4Y, RHP
44. Brian Miller, 4Y, OF
45. Hagen Danner, HS, RHP/C
46. Luis Campusano, HS, C
47. Stuart Fairchild, 4Y, OF
48. Ryan Vilade, HS, 3B
49. Steven Jennings, HS, RHP
50. Conner Uselton, HS, OF
51. Jeter Downs, HS, SS
52. Brady McConnell, HS, SS
53. Garrett Mitchell, HS, OF
54. MJ Melendez, HS, C
55. Chris Seise, HS, SS
56. Jacob Heatherly, HS, LHP
57. Cole Brannen, HS, OF
58. Alex Scherff, HS, RHP
59. Luke Heimlich, 4Y, LHP
60. Brent Rooker, 4Y, 1B/OF
61. Blaine Knight, 4Y (So.), RHP
62. Michael Mercado, HS, RHP
62. Kevin Merrell, 4Y, 2B/SS/OF
64. Matt Tabor, HS, RHP
65. Cal Mitchell, HS, OF/1B
66. Gavin Sheets, 4Y, 1B
67. Caden Lemons, HS, RHP
68. James Marinan, HS, RHP
69. Jacob Pearson, HS, OF
70. JJ Matijevic, 4Y, 1B/2B
71. Morgan Cooper, 4Y, RHP
72. Drew Rasmussen, 4Y, RHP
73. Riley Adams, 4Y, C/OF
74. Drew Ellis, 4Y, 3B/1B
75. Bryce Bonnin, HS, RHP/SS
76. Kyle Hurt, HS, RHP
77. Daniel Cabrera, HS, OF
78. Luis Gonzalez, 4Y, OF/LHP
79. Mason House, HS, OF
80. Jake Eder, HS, LHP
81. Jake Thompson, 4Y, RHP
82. Kevin Smith, 4Y, SS
83. Evan Skoug, 4Y, C
84. Daniel Tillo, JC (So.), LHP
85. Shane Drohan, HS, LHP
86. Chris McMahon, HS, RHP
87. Michael Gigliotti, OF
88. Greg Jones, HS, SS
89. Greg Deichmann, OF/1B/3B
90. Seth Corry, HS, LHP
91. Jeremiah Estrada, HS, RHP
92. Spencer Howard, 4Y (So.), RHP
93. Connor Wong, 4Y, C/SS
94. Landon Leach, HS, RHP
95. KJ Harrison, 4Y, 1B/C
96. Matt Whatley, 4Y, C
97. Peter Solomon, 4Y, RHP
98. Tommy Mace, HS, RHP
99. Zac Lowther, 4Y, LHP
100. Ernie Clement, 4Y, SS/OF
101. Jacob Gonzalez, HS, 3B/1B
102. Tyler Johnson, 4Y, RHP
103. Adam Hall, HS, SS
104. Garrett Cave, 4Y, RHP
105. Trevor Stephan, 4Y, RHP
106. Blake Hunt, HS, C
107. Colton Hock, 4Y, RHP
108. Zach Rutherford, 4Y, SS
109. Taylor Walls, 4Y, SS
110. Cole Turney, HS, OF
111. Evan Steele, JC (So.), LHP
112. Michael Baumann, 4Y, RHP
113. Joe Dunand, 4Y, SS/3B
114. Asa Lacy, HS, LHP
115. Kyle Jacobsen, HS, OF
116. Adam Oviedo, HS, SS
117. Dalton Guthrie, 4Y, SS
118. Zach Pop, 4Y, RHP
119. Daulton Varsho, 4Y, C
120. Devin Hairston, 4Y, SS/2B
121. Tony Dibrell, 4Y, RHP
122. Tyler Freeman, HS, SS
123. Joey Morgan, 4Y, C
124. Riley Mahan, 4Y, 2B/OF
125. Sam McMillan, HS, C
126. Will Gaddis, 4Y, RHP
127. Brendan Murphy, 4Y, LHP
128. Joe Perez, HS, RHP/1B/3B
129. Riley Ottesen, 4Y (So.), RHP
130. CJ Van Eyk, HS, RHP
131. Bryce Montes De Oca, 4Y, RHP
132. Jesse Berardi, 4Y, SS
133. Jake Mangum, 4Y (So.), OF
134. Quinn Brodey, 4Y, OF
135. Cade Cavalli, HS, RHP
136. Hunter Ruth, HS, RHP
137. Ricardo De La Torre, HS, SS
138. Sam Keating, HS, RHP
139. Andrew Bechtold, JC (So.), 3B
140. Jared Oliva, 4Y, OF
141. Jake Holmes, HS, SS
142. Donovan Casey, 4Y, OF
143. Noah Campbell, HS, SS
144. Gavin Williams, HS, RHP
145. Jack Leftwich, HS, RHP
146. Logan Allen, HS, LHP
147. Glenn Otto, 4Y, RHP
148. Charlie Barnes, 4Y, LHP
149. Lincoln Henzman, 4Y, RHP
150. Mike Rivera, 4Y, C
151. David Banuelos, 4Y, C
152. James Karinchak, 4Y, RHP
153. Seth Lonsway, HS, LHP
154. Zack Jackson, HS, C
155. Oliver Jaskie, 4Y, LHP
156. Jordan Anderson, HS, OF
157. Jackson Rutledge, HS, RHP
158. Nick Raquet, 4Y (So.), LHP
159. Tarik Skubal, 4Y, LHP
160. Caleb Sloan, HS, RHP
161. Steven Williams, HS, C
162. Daniel Ritcheson, HS, RHP
163. Chris Williams, 4Y, C
164. Keegan Thompson, 4Y, RHP
165. Brian Shaffer, 4Y, RHP
166. Austin Martin, HS, SS/2B
167. Seth Lonsway, HS, LHP
168. Griff McGarry, HS, RHP
169. Spencer Strider, HS, RHP
170. Jordan Spicer, JC (Fr.), RHP
171. Freddy Tarnok, HS, RHP
172. Mac Sceroler, 4Y, RHP
173. Carmen Mlodzinski, HS, RHP
174. Emerson Hancock, HS, RHP
175. Erich Uelmen, 4Y, RHP
176. Cordell Dunn, HS, C
177. Tommy Doyle, 4Y, RHP
178. Bryce Johnson, 4Y, OF
179. Ryley Widell, JC (So.), LHP
180. Jordan Fowler, HS, LHP
181. Philip Clarke, HS, C
182. Dylan Busby, 4Y, 3B/1B
183. Alex Toral, HS, 1B
184. Chad Spanberger, 4Y, 1B
185. Terry Fuller, HS, OF
186. Ricky Tyler Thomas, 4Y, LHP
187. Austin Wade, 4Y, OF
188. Joe Lancellotti, HS, RHP
189. Hugh Fisher, HS, LHP
190. Ryan Lillie, 4Y, RHP
191. Christian Sanatana, HS, RHP
192. Deon Stafford, 4Y, C
193. Cory Abbott, 4Y, RHP
194. Kyle Johnston, 4Y, RHP
195. Cole Freeman, 4Y, 2B
196. Zach Haake, 4Y (So.), RHP
197. Reynaldo Rivera, JC (So.), 1B
198. Colby Fitch, 4Y, C
199. Griffin Roberts, 4Y (So.), RHP
200. Logan Salow, 4Y (Sr.), LHP

20-80 Word Scouting Reports, 2017 MLB Draft Part 13

Previous entries in this series:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 |
Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10 | Part 11 | Part 12

Now the thirteenth installment in a series of scouting reports on players for the upcoming 2017 MLB Draft. As always, observations are a mix of my own and various scouting services:

Pavin Smith – 1B
6’2, 210
B/T: L/L
Draft age: 21.3
Junior at Virginia
Last drafted: 2014, 32nd (Colorado)

Generally regarded as the best pure hitter in the draft. Has a nice and easy left-handed swing that generates loft. Even more impressive is Smith’s ability to control the strike zone and swing only at his pitches. He’s probably limited to first base defensively, but could probably hack left field. How much power he’s able to tap into will be key to success due to defensive limitations. Below average runner.


Riley Adams – C
6’5, 215
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.11
Junior at San Diego
Last drafted: 2014, 37th (Chicago Cubs)

Really, really big for a catcher. Moves well side to side and has a plus arm, but there are legitimate concerns about blocking, framing, and throwing mechanics. Very good bat speed and natural loft from a strong frame. Power is mostly pull side and sometimes has difficulty controlling outer half of strike zone. Will be drafted for his bat with the hope he can stick behind the plate.


Zach Pop – RHP
6’4, 225
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.8
Junior at Kentucky
Last drafted: 2014, 23rd round (Toronto)

Out of the pen, Pop rushes the ball up into the high 90s with some sink. His slider can touch 90 as well, though it doesn’t have outstanding movement. Command has been a huge hurdle for Pop to overcome, and with a short stride, cross body delivery it may always be. Poor command and total lack of a changeup probably preclude him from being a starter as a pro.


Sam Keating – RHP
6’3, 175
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.9
Canterbury HS, FL
Commitment: Clemson

Like many high school seniors, Keating saw an uptick in his velocity this spring, which now sees his fastball getting up to 95, and sitting in the low 90s. Not a ton of movement, but good plane from his arm angle. There is some worry about effort of delivery and arm motion, which to some gives him a reliver profile. Throws a slider and changeup that could be above average down the road.


Peter Solomon – RHP
6’4, 190
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.9
Junior at Notre Dame
Last drafted: 2014, 21st round (San Diego)

A bit of a project for being a college pitcher. Solomon has good arm strength and a clean delivery, but has not been able to harness his command with any consistency, even after moving to the bullpen. When he’s on, Solomon pounds the strike zone with a lively 92-95 mph fastball. He also throws a slider and curveball, but they tend to blend together. Changeup is a distant fourth pitch.


Daulton Varsho – C
5’10, 200
B/T: L/R
Draft age: 21.2
Junior at Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Last drafted: Never

Son of big leaguer Gary Varsho. A very athletic backstop, Varsho exhibits excellent lateral mobility and blocking skill. He’s even a plus runner. The hangup with his defense is his well below-average throwing arm. Also has above average raw power, but more modest hand speed he’ll have to prove can handle pro pitching.


Tony Dibrell – RHP
6’3, 190
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.11
Junior at Kennesaw State
Last drafted: Never

A solid four pitch mix lead by 91-95 mph fastball make Dibrell a legitimate starter candidate as a pro. He’s made progress every year at Kennesaw State, and many feel there is still some projection left. In addition to his fastball, Dibrell throws a slider, changeup, and curve, in that order of effectiveness. The biggest step forward he needs to take is with command, which can still be a bugaboo from time to time.


Bryce Montes de Oca – RHP
6’7, 265
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.1
Junior at Missouri
Last drafted: 2014, 14th round (White Sox)

Huge, intimidating dude. And not just because of his size – Montes de Oca throws a very heavy fastball that will touch 100 in shorter outings and sit in the middle 90s as a starter. He has a very physical delivery as well. All of that combined with below average command make him a scary at-bat. Curveball projects as average. Changeup is a long ways off. Probably a reliever as a pro, and could be a really good one.


Quinn Brodey – OF
6’1, 195
B/T: L/L
Draft age: 21.6
Junior at Stanford
Last drafted: 2014, 37th round (Washington)

Came to Stanford with across-the-board average tools, but his arm and running speed have regressed since high school. He’s probably limited to left field. He has solid average raw power but his hit tool is closer to fringe average, so there is some question as to how much of that he’ll be able to tap into as a pro.


Hunter Ruth – RHP
6’3, 195
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.0
F.W. Buchholz HS, FL
Commitment: Florida

Was one of the top high school right handed pitching prospects before undergoing Tommy John surgery in April. Before the surgery, threw 93-96 with the makings of both a plus changeup and plus slider. He may or may not be drafted high enough to forego his commitment to Florida.


20-80 Word Scouting Reports, 2017 MLB Draft Part 12

Previous entries in this series:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10 | Part 11

Now the twelfth installment in a series of scouting reports on players for the upcoming 2017 MLB Draft. As always, observations are a mix of my own and various scouting services:

Hans Crouse – RHP
6’4, 185
B/T: L/R
Draft age: 18.8
Dana Hills HS, CA
Commitment: Southern California

The most entertaining player in the draft. Wacky mechanics and a wacky personality to match. Also happens to own one of the best fastballs, which sits at 94-97, among any player in the draft. Velocity is accentuated by the way he’s able to hide the ball. Even varies delivery ala Johnny Cueto. Slider and changeup both need work and there’s worry he’s a reliever due to delivery and work needed on offspeed.


Jacob Gonzalez – 1B/3B
6’4, 210
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.11
Chaparral HS, AZ
Commitment: TCU

Son of long time big leaguer Luis Gonzalez. Big right handed bat with big time pop to match. Has shown improved aptitude for making adjustments at the plate between last spring and this spring, but questions about hitting for average remain. His arm and glove at third are both lacking, though arm might play in left field. A move to first is more likely. He’s a below average runner as well.


Asa Lacy – LHP
6’4, 198
B/T: L/L
Draft age: 18.0
Tivy HS, TX
Commitment: Texas A&M

The type of kid that could well turn into a top college draft pick in a few years. Lacy throws in the high 80s, touching 91 with close to an overhand delivery that produces great plane on his fastball. Potential for plus command. His changeup already flashes above average. Key will be developing curveball, which given the nature of his mechanics, is an optimistic outcome.


Evan Skoug – C
5’11, 200
B/T: L/R
Draft age: 21.7
Junior at Texas Christian
Last drafted: 2014, 34th round (Washington)

Suffered through an awful slump to begin the season, which all but eliminated him from first round contention. Skoug packs a punch in his compact frame, flashing power to all fields with a short, quick stroke. His defense may or may not pass muster at the next level, though he’s on the short side for a first baseman if he has to move there.


Garrett Cave – RHP
6’4, 200
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.10
Junior at Tampa
Last drafted: 2015, 17th round (Yankees)

Overpowering fastball graded out at 65-75 on the scouting scale. He can run it up there in short bursts 97+ mph, with armside run and some dip. Maintains velocity as a starter in 93-95 range. Sweeping slider is also a plus pitch, and he throws a cutter variation as well. Looming question for Cave is command, which grades out poorly. Most see him as a reliever due to this and lack of changeup.


Taylor Walls – SS
5’10, 180
B/T: S/R
Draft age: 20.11
Junior at Florida State
Last drafted: Never

While he’s generally regarded as a utility player at the pro level, Walls does enough at the plate and as a shortstop that he could well have a future as a starter at the position. He lacks pop, but has a nice line drive swing with solid gap power. He also works the count very well, drawing walks by the dozen. Not a speedster, but runs well enough. Has the arm for shortstop, or anywhere else on the field.


Evan Steele – LHP
6’4, 210
B/T: R/L
Draft age: 20.6
Sophomore at Chipola JC
Last drafted: Never

Funky, near side-arm delivery thrown across his body gives Steele a ton of deception and his command isn’t as effected by it as you’d think. Fastball runs up 90-94, touching higher and exhibiting very good angle to the plate. Slider is a strikeout pitch right now, and he’s able to manipulate its shape. Changeup has made a lot of progress this year. Should absolutely be tried as a starter as a pro.


Tyler Freeman – SS/2B
6’0, 170
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.0
Etiwanda HS, CA
Commitment: TCU

If Freeman had any standout tool, he’d be a sure-fire first day prospect. He is solid across the board, arguably earning 50 scouting grades on each of the five major tools. He’s also shown consistent performance on the field and is regarded as having an outstanding baseball acumen. Might end up going to school to improve his draft stock, but if a team sees tools that have yet to break out, he’ll be popped in the first few rounds.


Joey Morgan – C
6’1, 205
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.9
Junior at Washington
Last drafted: Never

No worries about Morgan sticking behind the plate. He shows great lateral movement for blocking, and has above average pop times coupled with an above average arm. Also regarded as a good game caller. Morgan works the count well, but will need to continue working on offensive approach.


Jake Mangum – OF
6’4, 165
B/T: S/L
Draft age: 21.2
RS Sophomore at Mississippi State
Last drafted: Never

Pinball on the field, bouncing around everywhere exuding energy. Has all the tools to be a premium top of the order hitter, save for an aversion to walks. Mangum has superior bat to ball skills, which should at least keep his batting average afloat. Double plus speed, but still learning how to steal bases. Plus arm and range in center. Probably a tough sign as he looks to improve his draft stock for next year.


20-80 Word Scouting Reports, MLB Draft 2017 Part 11

Previous entries in this series:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10

Now the eleventh installment in a series of scouting reports on players for the upcoming 2017 MLB Draft. As always, observations are a mix of my own and various scouting services:

Nate Pearson – RHP
6’6, 240
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.9
Sophomore at Central Florida JC
Previously drafted: Never

There with Brendon Little as top juco talent in draft. Huge guy, though conditioning doesn’t seem to be an issue. Touches 100; works in the middle 90s with solid velocity stamina. Fastball has good sink. Changeup regarded as best chance at second plus pitch, showing decent fade. Slider also has a chance to be above average. Neither are there regularly yet. Present plus control from high 3/4 delivery; command should be at least average. Has a screw in his elbow.


Caden Lemons – RHP
6’6, 175
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.6
Vestavia Hills HS, AL
Commitment: Mississippi

Lemons has a huge wingspan that would not look out of place as a member of the Milwaukee Bucks. He has not quite mastered repeating his mechanics, and his arm slot can be all over the place. Which in turn means control and command have a ways to go. Fastball runs up into the mid-90s but sits in the low-90s. No clear offspeed pitch yet, and wavering arm slot doesn’t help that. Will need a lot of development time.


Connor Wong – C
5’11, 180
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.0
Junior at Houston
Last drafted: Never

Basically is a shortstop playing catcher. And a catcher who can also play anywhere else on the diamond. Wong is about the best athlete in the college catching ranks, which serves him well behind the plate. He’s only started playing the position regularly in the past few years, so there is still development needed. At the plate, swing is simple and there’s at least gap power. Maybe most strangely, is a plus baserunner and base stealer.


Trevor Stephan – RHP
6’5, 225
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.6
Junior at Arkansas
Last drafted: 2016 18th round (Boston)

A fastball-first pitcher with some reliever risk due to inconsistency in offspeed weaponry. His fastball is a good one, commanded to either side of the plate and hidden with a crossfire delivery. It sneaks up on opposing hitters at 95, and has decent run, if not much sink. Slider and changeup both need work, though his slider has come along this year. Developing those pitches will be crucial to staying in the rotation.


Cordell Dunn – C
6’0, 190
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 17.11
Center Hill HS, MS
Commitment: Texas Tech

Intriguing prep catcher who is raw and will need time, but has potential big time upside. Dunn is a bit young for his class, which helps. Explosive swing using almost all upper body strength, though it gets grooved and he can have trouble barreling up offspeed. Arm is around average and pop times can be good, but just about everything defensively is inconsistent.


Riley Mahan – 2B/OF
6’3, 185
B/T: L/R
Draft age: 21.5
Junior at Kentucky
Last drafted: 2015, 40th round (San Francisco)

Moved off shortstop to second base this year, and seems destined to move off second to a corner OF position as a pro. Mahan has both erratic hands and erratic command from an otherwise plus arm. He is more than athletic enough to play second, if hands can be improved. A very good line drive hitter with at least average power potential, though there will be strikeouts as well. A tick above average runner.


Sam McMillan – C
6’1, 195
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.6
Suwannee HS, FL
Commitment: Florida

High school backstops are the single most risky draft selection, and the defensive-first subgroup are even more risky than the hitters. McMillan falls into that defensive category, so a team would have to project heavily onto his bat to make a high draft selection make sense. He is a quality defender is all facets, and the hitting might come down the line. May be likely to honor commitment to Florida.


Will Gaddis – RHP
6’1, 185
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.2
Junior at Furman
Last drafted: 2014, 36th round (Yankees)

In a word, pitchability. Gaddis’ distinction is that he has one of the higher floors among top college pitchers in this class. Shows advanced command of a modestly heavy 89-92 mph fastball. Has a complete arsenal of pitches, including a curve, cutter, and changeup, though none of them are much more than average at their best. His frame is on the smaller side, though durability hasn’t been an issue.


Riley Ottesen – RHP
6’0, 185
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 22.7
Sophomore at Utah
Last drafted: Never

Old for his class due to LDS mission, and also relatively inexperienced because of it. Throws really hard, into the mid-90s, though fastball has little deception and is straight. Slider and changeup can be useful at times, but neither project as more than average, and command is often lacking. For all of those reasons, Ottesen is most likely going to be a reliever in pro ball.


Cade Cavalli – RHP
6’4, 200
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.9
Bixby HS, OK
Commitment: Oklahoma

Has missed a lot of time with injury, first a wrist last summer and now a back this spring. Physically mature and gets mid-90s velocity without a ton of effort. Control is there, command is not quite. Offspeed stuff needs work. Slider shows promise at times. Changeup is barely ever used. Teams will have to dream a little on him to see a future as a starter, but he at least has the groundwork laid. Old for class.


20-80 Word Scouting Reports, MLB Draft 2017 Part 10

Previous entries in this series:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9

Now the tenth installment in a series of scouting reports on players for the upcoming 2017 MLB Draft. As always, observations are a mix of my own and various scouting services:

Jeren Kendall – OF
5’10, 180
B/T: L/R
Draft age: 21.4
Junior at Vanderbilt
Last drafted: 2014, 30th (Boston)

The two thing primarily associated with Kendall from a scouting perspective are his premium speed and his swing and miss tendencies at the plate. His hitting will make or break him as a player. Swing gets long and pitch recognition is not great. Draws comparisons to Jacoby Ellsbury and Corey Ray. A very good defender that should have no problem sticking in center, and he has an above average arm there. At least average power. Great athlete.


Griffin Canning – RHP
6’1, 170
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.1
Junior at UCLA
Last drafted: 2014, 38th (Colorado)

A pitcher in every sense of the word. Canning throws four pitches, all of which grade average to plus depending on the day. In addition to a 90-94 fastball that has decent sink, he also throws a short slider, curveball, and changeup. There’s no consensus on which one is the best, but he throws them all for strikes. He uses all quadrants of the plate as well. Shorter pitcher, but clean high 3/4 delivery. High pitch counts are concerning.


Conner Uselton – OF
6’3, 185
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 19.0
Southmoore HS, OK
Commitment: Oklahoma State

One of the most complete hitting prospects in high school this year. Uselton ticks the boxes for size, strength, speed, and thunder in his bat. Very physical, aggressive approach in batter’s box. Deep hand load, quick hands, and good elevation. He hits bombs. Will chase outside – contact ability is biggest question mark. Above average runner, easy plus arm. Looks like a prototypical right fielder. Could be tough sign – already 19 and eligible for draft again in two years.


Brian Miller – OF
6’0, 187
B/T: L/R
Draft age: 21.9
Junior at North Carolina
Last drafted: Never

Former walk-on who has exceeded all expectations and has become one of the premier table-setters in the country. Miller is a 65-70 runner who takes good routes in center field and has enough arm – just enough – to stick there. Does a good job both working pitchers for walks and making contact when he needs to. Power isn’t there outside of batting practice, but it’s possible swing tweaks could lead to more of it in-game.


Blaine Knight – RHP
6’3, 165
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.11
Sophomore at Arkansas
Last drafted: Never

A tall but quite slender righty. The upside of his body type is you can dream up a lot of physical projection. The downside is there will be questions about durability. His physical delivery adds to durability concern. Knight’s best pitch is a 91-94 fastball that touches 97, with which he exhibits great command. None of his secondary pitches are of the strikeout variety yet, though there are good reports on both his slider and changeup.


Matt Tabor – RHP
6’2, 160
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.10
Milton Academy HS, MA
Commitment: Elon

Tabor’s senior year growth spurt pushed his fastball velocity up from the mid 80s touching 90, into the middle 90s touching 97. Tabor has great arm speed and generates solid run, though his delivery gets off balance. He throws a breaking ball that’s somewhere in-between a slider and curve, and isn’t really either most of the time. His changeup is the better offspeed pitch, showing plus potential. A northeast kid, Tabor needs more reps to gain consistency.


Shane Drohan – LHP
6’2, 190
B/T: R/L
Draft age: 18.5
Cardinal Newman HS, FL
Commitment: Florida State

Calling card is not velocity, but command of three solid pitches. Drohan throws his fastball in the upper 80s, scraping 90-91. The pitch does have nice movement, and he’s able to command it. His curveball is advanced for his age, breaking 11-5 with great spin. Many project his changeup as above average as well. Whether or not there’s more velocity coming is an open question, but with the stuff he has now, he may not need it.


Ernie Clement – SS/OF
6’0, 165
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.2
Junior at Virginia
Last drafted: Never

In 516 at-bats between 2016-2017, Clement struck out a grand total of 19 times. Granted he also walked only 26 times. Obviously has elite bat to ball skills. It’s not always hard contact, though, and his power is well below average. He’s an above average runner and modestly successful base stealer. Can play shortstop and center, though arm is just adequate at either position.


Blake Hunt – C
6’3, 180
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.7
Mater Dei HS, CA
Commitment: Pepperdine

Defensive-first catcher who has maybe hit enough this spring to be drafted high enough to forego his commitment to Pepperdine. Hunt has a strong arm, quick pop time, sets low well for his size, and moves laterally well, too. He has some power in his bat, and he is plenty athletic enough at the plate, but he’s likely going to be somewhat of an offensive project for the team that signs him.


Michael Baumann – RHP
6’4, 225
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.9
Junior at Jacksonville
Last drafted: 2014, 34th round (Minnesota)

Big, physical pitcher who throws a lively middle-90s fastball and a very good slider with late life. Also throws a more pedestrian curveball and changeup, though they are both usable pitches. Baumann struggles with command due in part to long arm circle and crossbody delivery. If he can find more consistency in his delivery, he could be a steal a few rounds into the draft as his raw stuff is first-round worthy.


20-80 Word Scouting Reports, 2017 MLB Draft Part 9

Previous entries in this series:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8

Now the ninth upload in a series of scouting reports on players for the upcoming 2017 MLB Draft. Again, observations are a mix of my own and various scouting services:

Trevor Rogers – LHP
6’6, 185
B/T: L/L
Draft age: 19.7
Carlsbad HS, NM
Commitment: Texas Tech

A high schooler, but Rogers turns 20 a few months after this season. Tall lefty with velocity consistency issues – has been 93-96, also has been 88-90. Fastball command is unusually great for a big, lanky kid. High knee to chin leg kick and lower 3/4 delivery creates good angle for improving slider. He throws across his body a bit. Short stride out of stretch. His changeup is coming along as well. Lacks command of breaking pitches at times.


Matt Sauer – RHP
6’4, 205
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.4
Ernest Righetti HS, CA
Commitment: Arizona

Another in a series of tall, lanky high school righties. Sauer throws harder than most of them, as his present velocity already ticks up into the high 90s. Also throws a sharp slider. Biggest question surrounding Sauer is his delivery. He has a long arm stroke and big head whack upon delivery. Those things combined with a nascent changeup lead some to project him as a reliever. His drafting team will undoubtedly leave him as a starter for now.


Clarke Schmidt – RHP
6’1, 200
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.3
Junior at South Carolina
Last drafted: Never

An easy mid-first round pick coming into the spring, Schmidt blew out his elbow and went under the knife for Tommy John surgery. He will still get drafted, and quite possibly on draft day one. That speaks to his stuff: sometimes overwhelming mid-90s heat, coupled with a plus change and average curve and changeup. Command is also borderline plus. The team drafting him will need to be patient, but may well be rewarded.


Steven Jennings – RHP
6’2, 175
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.6
Dekalb County HS, TN
Commitment: Mississippi

A quarterback on his high school team, Jennings tore his ACL in the fall and was not seen again on a baseball diamond until later this spring. Has impressive stuff, including a 91-93 mph fastball and two potential plus breaking balls in a curve and slider. Changeup could be come average and delivery is pretty clean. He does have a smaller frame and has battled consistency issues in his return to the mound.


Stuart Fairchild – OF
5’11, 180
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.2
Junior at Wake Forest
Last drafted: 2014, 38th round (Washington)

Next to Jeren Kendall, may be the tools-iest/high upside college hitter in the draft. Fairchild is a plus runner, takes very good routes in centerfield, and his arm is more than good enough to stay there. Also has at least average power potential in his compact frame. Hit tool is biggest question as his swing involves a bit of an arm bar, though many college onlookers were impressed at his progress this year.


Kyle Hurt – RHP
6’4, 205
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 19.0
Torrey Pines HS, CA
Commitment: Southern California

A big righty who shows more polish than most his age. Hurt has heavy sink on a 91-94 mph fastball, which he throws from a very clean and easy delivery into a high 3/4 arm slot. He has the makings of a plus curveball and plus changeup as well. Command is already at least average. Knee injury cost him early part of season, but if that pushes his stock down, the team that drafts him will be getting a great value.


Michael Gigliotti – OF
6’1, 176
B/T: L/L
Draft age: 21.3
Junior at Lipscomb
Last drafted: Never

If nothing else, Gigliotti knows what kind of player he has to be. Lean, wiry speedster who has developed extraordinary bunting skills and works the count. Plays a plus center field as well. His outfield arm is a few ticks below average, though most think it is passable. Not much power, to the gaps at best most of the time, and bat speed is so-so. Very slow start at the plate this year cost him some draft position.


Colton Hock – RHP
6’4, 220
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.2
Junior at Stanford
Last drafted: Never

A reliever at the collegiate level, many think Hock should be given a chance to start as a pro. It’s not a bad idea. Big, durable frame and his delivery doesn’t have a ton of effort. He comes almost over the top and gets phenomenal sink on his fastball, which sits 91-93. Curveball command waivers, but when it’s on it is at least a plus pitch. Will need to develop a changeup from scratch to start at pro level, however.


Dalton Guthrie – SS
5’11, 185
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.5
Junior at Florida
Last drafted: 2014, 40th round (Minnesota)

Diamond-savvy son of MLB veteran lefty Mark Guthrie. The younger Guthrie is a plus defensive shortstop with agility and soft hands. An arm injury in the fall sapped some of his arm strength, which was already fringe average for the position. He’s an above average runner with well below average power. Bat to ball skills are there, and he’ll need them if he has to move off of shortstop.


Kyle Jacobsen – OF
6’0, 185
B/T: R/L
Draft age: 19.0
Allatoona HS, GA
Commitment: South Carolina

Like first round prospect Evan White, Jacobsen has the rare backwards hit/throw profile. A 65-70 grade runner/natural base stealer with intriguing power potential and great skill as a defender in center field. The main issue with Jacobsen is swing and miss in his swing due to a pronounced arm bar. This will need to be addressed once he turns pro or goes to college.


20-80 Word Scouting Reports, 2017 MLB Draft Part 8

Previous entries in this series:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Now the eighth upload in a series of scouting reports on players for the upcoming 2017 MLB Draft. Again, observations are a mix of my own and various scouting services:

Drew Waters – OF
6’2, 190
B/T: S/R
Draft age: 18.5
Etowah HS, GA
Commitment: Georgia

Best high school switch hitter in the draft class. Waters has a big timing step in his setup, but his bat takes a nice, clean path to the ball from both sides, and he regularly produces hard, line drive contact. Power is better from left side right now. He’s a plus runner with a plus arm, and should be able to stay in center field long term. There’s some worry about offspeed recognition.


Tristen Lutz – OF
6’3, 205
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.9
Martin HS, TX
Commitment: Texas

Lutz could walk into an MLB dugout tomorrow and not look out of place. Mature physically, and a rock solid athlete. Calling card is power, but he also shows good barrel control and uses the whole field despite a lot of pre-swing hand movement. Plays center now, however he is likely moves to right field as a pro. He has a strong, easy plus arm. Running speed is average, but he has good outfield instincts.


Luke Heimlich – LHP
6’0, 190
B/T: L/L
Draft age: 21.4
Junior at Oregon State
Last drafted: Never

“Pitchability” is the word that keeps coming up with Heimlich. A smallish lefty with a tick above average command, he does throw hard enough into the low 90s to avoid the “crafty” tag. From a high 3/4 arm slot, he gets some sink and cut on his fastball, which he readily moves around the zone. He is also adept at manipulating his curve, and his change is adequate. General consensus is back-end rotation guy.


James Marinan – RHP
6’5, 220
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.8
Park Vista Community HS, FL
Commitment: Miami

One of the taller high school pitchers in the draft. Was a two-way prospect up to this season, and would project as a solid first base prospect as well. Fastball is his primary pitch, which runs up to 95 with really good sink thanks to high 3/4 delivery from his already imposing frame. Arm action is clean, though he lands partially closed, which is a red flag for some people. Curve projects as average. Changeup is in its infancy.


Joe Perez – RHP/1B/3B
6’3, 210
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 17.10
Archbishop Edward McCarthy HS, FL
Commitment: Miami

Young for his class, but unfortunately that development time will be eaten up by rehabbing his Tommy John surgery, which Perez had just a few weeks before the draft. Yet another two-way prospect, Perez was a third baseman for most of his prep career. He has plus power potential with the bat. Huge fastball from the mound, though he’s still learning how to pitch. Slider has a chance to be plus, too. A project before Tommy John, now even moreso.


Bryce Bonnin – RHP/SS
6’1, 180
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.8
Barbers Hill HS, TX
Commitment: Arkansas

Shorter but athletic sinker-slider pitcher. Bonnin gets good sink on his fastball, which runs 90-95. He’s relatively new to pitching, having played third base mostly as a prep (similar to Perez above). He should develop more consistent velocity as he focuses on pitching. Slider is also inconsistent, but flashes between plus and double plus. Crossfire delivery with long arm action creates deception and command issues. Changeup isn’t there yet.


Matt Whatley – C
5’10, 190
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.5
Junior at Oral Roberts
Last drafted: Never

A solid defender with contact issues. Whatley grades out above average in both blocking and arm strength behind the dish, and is regarded as a leader on the field. He walks a lot, and strikes out a lot. Has above average power, but uses a long swing to get to it. He runs decently for a catcher as he’s pretty athletic. Projects right now as fringe second division starter, but swing improvements could boost that.


Adam Oviedo – SS
6’0, 186
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.5
Alvarado HS, TX
Commitment: TCU

Oviedo has a plus arm and glove at shortstop, and has a chance to stick there as a pro. He doesn’t have outstanding agility or foot speed however, so there’s some thought he winds up at second or third. Hit tool draws some questions. He can mash fastballs, but gets over-committed to fastball hunting and can get fooled by offspeed stuff. Busy swing, but he gets some loft.


Joe Dunand – SS/3B
6’2, 205
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.8
Junior at North Carolina State
Last drafted: 2014, 35th round (Cleveland)

Nephew of Alex Rodriguez, whatever that amounts to. Has two above average tools: power and arm. His approach at the plate can be lacking, which may give him difficultly in getting to his 55-60 grade power in pro ball. Hit tool is 40, maybe 45. His arm at shortstop or third is very good as well. He’s athletic, and he may start at shortstop as a pro, but he likely shifts to third at some point. Below average runner.


Tommy Mace – RHP
6’6, 195
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.7
Sunlake HS, FL
Commitment: Florida

Height closer to 6’7 now, which gives him a few inches even on the aforementioned James Marinan. There can be a lot going on with his delivery, though Mace repeats relatively well given his limb length and experience. Upper body-lower body timing seems to be biggest issue, as he seems to land early at times. Fastball is 92-95 with great plane when Mace gets full extension. Curveball gets projected as plus, and at times is there now. Changeup needs work.


20-80 Word Scouting Reports, MLB Draft 2017 Part 7

Previous entries in this series:

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

Now the seventh upload in a series of somewhere under 20 uploads of scouting reports on players for the upcoming 2017 MLB Draft. Again, observations are a mix of my own and various scouting services:

Alex Faedo – RHP
6’5, 225
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.6
Junior at Florida
Last drafted: 2014, 40th (Detroit)

A power sinker-slider pitcher with a change-up that was plus in the past, Faedo has a prototypical build scouts seeking out a frontline starter are looking for. There is a fair amount of worry about his delivery, both for his high-cocked elbow and unbalanced landing. The landing worry is exacerbated by arthroscopic surgery performed on both knees before the season. Fastball is 90-95 with run and sink. Slider is near-Bukauskas level. Scouts split on Faedo’s future in rotation.


Bubba Thompson – OF
6’2, 180
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 19.0
McGill-Toolen Catholic HS, AL
Commitment: Alabama

Superb athlete in the Monte Harrison mold. Thompson’s primary tool is his speed, which ranges between plus and double plus. Speed transfers over to defensive side of the ball, and with a plus arm he’s a very projectable defender in center. He hasn’t hit against top competition for the most part, so his hit tool may take some patience. He has a wide stance with moderate load, and uses hips well to drive the ball.


Blayne Enlow – RHP
6’4, 180
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 18.2
St. Amant HS, LA
Commitment: LSU

Enviable pitching frame for an 18 year old, though Enlow lags in velocity behind some of his top high school peers. Sits in the upper 88-91, though he has very good arm speed and exceptional mechanics for someone his age. His curveball is one of the best in the high school class, a true 12-6 with plus spin rate. Changeup is just there right now, but I saw a few good ones and it projects as at least average.


Morgan Cooper – RHP
6’4, 220
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 22.9
Redshirt Junior at Texas
Last drafted: 2016, 34th round (Washington)

Tommy John surgery in 2014 set Cooper’s career back, but he returned to form this spring. He throws nearly over the top, generating great plane on his 92-95 mph fastball. He has a full starter’s arsenal, throwing a changeup, curveball, cutter, and slider, in that order in terms of general effectiveness. The big question mark on Cooper is simply durability – will his arm be able to hold velocity if he starts every five days?


Kevin Smith – SS
6’1, 185
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.11
Junior at Maryland
Last drafted: Never

A defensive-first shortstop who should be able to stick there as a pro due to his quick, soft hands and arm that evaluators range between average and plus. Smith needs to work on strike zone management at the next level. Despite the aforementioned quick hands and plus raw power, he has difficulty getting to that power due to tendency to expand the zone and middling bat to ball skill.


Mason House – OF
6’2, 190
B/T: L/L
Draft age: 18.9
Whitehouse HS, TX
Commitment: Oklahoma State

A left-handed poor man’s Austin Beck, if you will. Went from virtual unknown to must-follow between last year and this. Largely untested against top level competition. Doesn’t have quite as much bat speed as Beck, but swing is not as violent either. House generates good loft with swing path and a big step before his swing, though that piece may need to be toned down. Above average speed and average arm. Most see him moving from center to a corner.


Tyler Johnson – RHP
6’2, 180
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 20.9
Junior at South Carolina
Last drafted: Never

The closer at South Carolina and looks like a reliever at the pro level as well. Throws a fastball and throws it hard, regularly gassing it upwards of 98-99 and occasionally touching 100. It has good life and is undoubtedly a MLB-caliber pitch. Johnson’s slider is far behind his fastball, though it has some late break. Changeup is probably not a viable pitch at pro level. Command is ok. High waisted but stride is on the short side, and slow.


Drew Rasmussen – RHP
6’1, 225
B/T: R/R
Draft age: 21.10
Junior at Oregon State
Last drafted: 2014, 39th round (Arizona)

Only started pitching in game action April after recovering from Tommy John surgery. A spark plug of a pitcher, Rasmussen throws in the mid-90s in short bursts with a heavy fastball. As a starter, sits in the low 90s. Shows good slider at times, but is inconsistent with it. Even more so with changeup. Due to injury and only a fastball as a plus pitch, many see him as a reliever. That’s not set in stone, however.


Greg Deichmann – OF/1B
6’2, 195
B/T: L/R
Draft age: 22.0
Junior at Louisiana State
Last drafted: 2015, 26th round (Minnesota)

A big power threat from the left side. Using just a small toe tap for timing, Deichmann uses above average bat speed and a lofted swing to hit balls over the wall to all fields. While he’s shown some more patience this year, is prone to striking out and may never carry a high batting average. Limited to corner OF/first base defensively due to lack of foot speed, though his arm is at least average.


Devin Hairston – 2B/SS
5’8, 175
R/R
Draft age: 21.2
Junior at Louisville
Last drafted: Never

One of the smaller players in the draft. Hairston has more than enough agility and glove skill to stick at shortstop, but his arm is quite fringey at the position. Many see him as a second baseman, or perhaps a center fielder. Makes solid line drive contact. Does not take enough walks and doesn’t have the elite speed you’d expect from someone his size.